Just Where Does Our Love of Beads Originate?

Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at: https://www.etsy.com/shop/carmilitaearrings

Women come naturally by their love for beads. They inherit it from their “great-great-twenty- seven-times-great-grandmother” — as the fairy tale says.

Close to the first rude implements for household work explorers find bits of shell, turquoise, amber, or lapis lazuli, pierced for stringing; rough and asymmetrical to be sure, but unmistakably beads. Each generation since the time of that very great-grandmother has had the taste for bead work in a greater or lesser degree, and with the different peoples it has shown itself differently.

With some it has been gorgeous and barbaric; others have wrought with exquisite fineness. Many have only seen in it a personal ornament; while others, like our North American Indian, have used it to beautify alike their household utensils and articles for ceremonial usage. Studying Indian handicrafts, we cannot but recognize the decorative possibilities of bead work.

The present interest in bead work undoubtedly sprang from our enthusiasm for Indian handicrafts. From admiring and wishing to possess baskets wrought with beads, and woven bead belts and chains, it was a natural and easy step to copying them. Whether the special branch of bead work one wishes to do is stringing, weaving, knitting, or sewing, the beads are, of course, the first consideration.

Wampum, the genuine Indian bead, is beautiful and costly. The wampum used by eastern tribes is long and cylindrical; in color ivory-white, black, or purple. Western wampum, shaped like tiny millstones, was generally made of clam-shells ground and drilled by hand. “The aboriginal tool for drilling, called dawihai (from da win, to bore, and hai, a stick), was a straight shaft of wood two feet long and half an inch in diameter at the middle. This the kneeling Indian twirled between the palms of his hands. The drill-point was of jasper or flint and fastened to the shaft by a lashing of hemp coated with pitch. Its origin is beyond tradition.

Sometimes the Indians fashioned beads of rainbow-colored abalone shells from the Pacific. The beautiful feather baskets of the Pomos are occasionally enriched by decorations of these beads. Again, in strings of white western wampum one finds a bead of wonderful sky-blue — an exquisite contrast; it is turquoise. These beads, however, are for a fortunate few. Those most of us must be content to possess are the Venetian glass beads, sometimes mistakenly spoken of as Indian, but which are only Indian because they are used by them.

In conclusion of “just where do our love for beads originate,” why, it is from the Indians of course, where else could it possibly be. Much, much we have all received from the Indians, and a love for beads is surely one of those things.

Reference Used: Copyright 1904 by Doubleday, Page and Company Published May 1904 (in public domain due to expiration of copyright)

White, Mary. How to Do Beadwork Complete with 100 Illustrations (Kindle Location 38). . Kindle Edition.

Re-Written by: Connie Limon, Bead Jewelry Artisan
Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at: https://www.etsy.com/shop/carmilitaearrings

Advertisements

Carmilita’s Elegant Collection Kambara Jasper Semiprecious Rounds Dangle Earrings: “Jasmine”

P1090647

Jasmine is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Elegant Collection. She dangles from the hook about one inch. Her focal point is the Kambara Jasper 12 mm Semiprecious Round beads.

Materials used:

2 gold plated 11×15 mm leverback earring hooks

2 gold plated head pins

2 antique gold plated 3 x 8 mm fancy bead caps

2 antique gold plated 4 x 10 mm Scroll-Work Bead Caps

2 antique gold plated 3 x 4 mm thick Rondelle Metal Beads

2 Caribbean 8 x 5 mm Glass Crystal Rondelles

2 Kambara Jasper 12 mm Semiprecious Rounds

Jasmine’s Price is $15 (includes shipping)

P1090648

P1090649

P1090650
Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Bead Dangle Earring Jewelry Making Technique Part 1: The Open Loop

P1090621

What is an open loop bead dangle? The open loop bead dangle is one jewelry making technique for making eye loops in the end of a wire jewelry component. This technique is used most often for making bead dangles to hang beads from earrings or necklaces. It is an acceptable technique to use when making lightweight earrings. For earrings having significant weight the “wrapped loop” technique is better and stronger to be able to hold greater weight.  However, for lightweight dangle earrings, the open loop works very well. Most of the earrings I am creating now are lightweight and are made using the open eye loop. In fact, I use the one step looper tool which works excellent in making consistently nice open loops.

In the photograph you can see an open loop.

To make the open loop without using the one step looper tool, you will need either about 4 inches of jewelry wire or an eye pin or head pin. The photograph here is actually the top of an eye pin. Eye pins always have the open loop at the end. You can open the loop with round nose pliers to start the beading process or to hang whatever you choose on your earrings, then close the loop back using the pliers. I use head pins for most of my earring designs. A headpin usually has a “stopper” at the end to keep the beads from falling off at least one end. This stopper point is either flat or on some head pins it is round.

You will also need round nose pliers, bent chain nose pliers and cutting pliers to make open loops on wire or head pins, that is, if you do not use the one step looper tool.

Step 1: Add your chosen beads to the head pin or wire.

Step 2: Grasp the wire or headpin immediately above your last bead u sing the bent chain nose pliers. To minimize the amount of wire or head pin above your last bead, grasp the wire or head pin right at the last bead using the tip of bent chain nose pliers. The technique is easier when you use 1/2 hard wire and even easier using the one step looper tool.

Step 3: Push the wire over 90 degrees with your thumb as close to the pliers as possible making a nice crisp bend. You do not want a “rounded” bend, and again, if you want perfect open loops every time, invest in the one step looper tool. This tool will save you a lot of headaches especially if you are making a lot of open loop earrings designs or you are a novice.

Step 4: Re-orientate the wire in your pliers to complete the loop and push the wire until you have completed a nice loop as shown in the eye pin photograph. Best loops are not exactly circle size, but a little like oval size.

Step 5: Inspect the loop to be sure it is centered. If the loop is off center, use your pliers to insert the loop fully and twist it one way or the other until the loop is centered over the vertical wire or head pin. The open loop forms a connecting point for earring hooks. You can either leave the open loop a little open or open up the loop on your earring hook. I usually just leave the open loop a little open and then close the loop after placing an earring hook.

Step 6: If you are using wire, you will now need to cut the excess wire using your cutting pliers. Place the flat side of wire cutter toward the finished wire component and cut excess wire at the point where it overlaps the beginning of the loop. If you are using a one step looper tool, the tool will cut the wire at the precise point needed while making your perfect size loop all in one step.

Step 7: After you have cut off the excess wire, you will need to close the loop with bent nose pliers. Simply grasp the loop and twist it closed.

Creating loops is actually the very first and most basic technique you will need to learn when making dangle earrings.

Written by: Connie Limon

Meet Joy:

P1090621

Joy is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Christmas Collection. She dangles about one inch from hook. She is appropriate for gift giving. She is also appropriate for wearing to any kind of Holiday celebration.

Materials used:

2 antique copper head pins

 

2 antique copper French earring hooks

3 antique copper 3 mm bead caps

2 red glass crackle beads 6 mm

2 milky white faceted glass bead

I chose to call these earrings “Joy” because of the joy people usually feel during the Christmas holidays. Joy is a popular name for girls born around Christmas time.
Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Carmilita’s Simplicity Handmade Bead Dangle Earring Collection Cloisonne Flower Beads: “Sandra”

P1090629

Sandra is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Handmade Dangle Earrings. She hangs about one inch from the hook. She simple, dainty, petite looking, colorful and elegant.

Materials used:

2 gold plated dange earrings

2 gold plated 2 inch head pins

2 sapphire 6 mm crystal bicones

2 blue 12 mm Cloisonne Flower Beads

2 black onyx 8 mm semiprecious rounds

2 gold plated 3 x 2 mm Rondelle Metal beads

Sandra’s Price: $15 (includes shipping)

P1090630

P1090631

P1090635

P1090636
Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Carmilita’s Romantic Collection Red Carnelian Semiprecious Stones Dangle Earrings: “Bonita”

P1090464

Bonita is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Romantic Collection. She dangles a little over one inch from the hook.

Materials used:

2 antique silver plated 11×15 mm leverback earring hooks

2 antique silver plated head pins

2 antique silver plated 3 x 9 mm decorative bead caps

2 antique silver plated 4 x 10 mm scroll-work bead caps

2 antique silver- plated 3 x 4 mm thick rondelle metal beads

2 red topaz 8 x 5 mm glass crystal rondelles

2 red Carnelian 12 mm semiprecious rounds

Bonita’s Price is $15 (includes shipping)

P1090465

P1090466
Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Carmilita’s Christmas Collection Handmade Red and Silver Dangle Earrings: “Bailey” (FREE SHIPPING)

P1090591

Bailey is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Christmas Collection of dangle earrings. She dangles a little more than one inch from the hook. Bailey’s focal point is the “lampwork” beads 12 mm. These are absolutely out of this world GORGEOUS Chinese Glass Beads. They have markings of gold splattered through the bead. Every time you turn your head and the light flickers through these beads it gives an illusion of a lamp shade with the light on inside, beautiful patterns of flowers light up behind the shade. Leave it to the Chinese artists to give us beautiful flower patterns in all designs!

These earrings say “holiday celebrations” for sure. They are appropriate for Christmas or New Year Party wear. They are appropriate for Holiday gift giving.

I chose the name “Bailey” for this pair of earrings in memory of the character in the movie “It’s A Wonderful Life.” When you wear these earrings I suspect you will feel happy, gay, in the spirit of Christmas, and “it’s a wonderful life.” When I look at these earrings, they say all those things to me. The beads also resemble “Christmas Bells.”

Materials used:
2 silver plated french earring hooks
2 silver plated beaded bead caps 3 mm
2 silver filigree (cut-out) beads 3 mm
2 sparkling red Swarovski glass round faceted beads 6 mm

Bailey’s Price is $15 (includes shipping)
Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

P1090592

P1090593

P1090594

 

 

August Birthstone Peridot May have Been the “Emeralds” of Egypt’s Famous Queen Cleopatra

I was born in August so I am keenly aware of the birthstone for that month which is “peridot.” The word “peridot” is derived from the Arabic word for gem, which is ‘faridat.’

The August birthstone of peridot is sometimes known as ‘the poor man’s emerald.’ It has always been associated with light. The Egyptians called the peridot gem, “gem of the sun,” and some egyptians believed it protected its owner from terrors of the night especially if the gemstone was set into gold.

An interesting note about the peridot gemstone is that some historians believe Queen Cleopatra of Egypt wore peridot gems referred to then as “emeralds.”

Queen Cleopatra was not actually Egyptian as she resided in her famous role of Queen of Egypt. She was of the Macedonian dynasty and was the last of her bloodline.

The peridot gemstone has other interesting aspects in past history in that the Romans called this gemstone “evening emerald,” because its color did not darken at night and could still be appreciated by candle light as well as campfire light. Ever notice the beautiful lime green colors in a peridot gemstone under candle light? It is a beautiful sight to see. Peridot gemstones come in several color variations ranging from a yellowish green to brown. I, like many lovers and buyers of the peridot stone prefer the bright lime greens. The Peridot stone is used a lot in smaller cut sizes for beaded earrings, necklaces and bracelets. It is a very much prized gem for its resting, peaceful yellowish green hues and interesting background history. The larger cut pieces can be super gorgeous and very attractive smaller cuts are widely available for all price ranges.

The Peridot gemstones is found in rounded rocks with peridot crystals inside in some lava flows in the U.S., China and Vietnam. Large crystals are found in some types of solidfied molten rock. Some people have said the Peridot gemstones have even been found on the planet Mars. It may be a bit softer than other stones requiring extra care from scratches.

Store handmade Peridot gemstone jewelry pieces separately from other pieces of jewelry most preferably wrapped in a soft cloth and in a fabric-lined protected jewelry box if possible to help preserve the quality of the stone. Peridot stones clean up easily using warm, mild soapy water and a soft toothbrush and cloth. Always rinse well after cleaning and never use ultrasonic cleaners or heat steamers to clear Peridot stones.

Written by: Connie Limon for Carmilita’s Handmade Jewelry

Meet: Joy

P1090621

Joy is a pair of dangle earrings I added to Carmilita’s Christmas Collection. She dangles about one inch from hook. She is appropriate for gift giving. She is also appropriate for wearing to any kind of Holiday celebration.

Materials used:

2 antique copper head pins

2 antique copper French earring hooks

3 antique copper 3 mm bead caps

2 red glass crackle beads 6 mm

2 milky white faceted glass bead

I chose to call these earrings “Joy” because of the joy people usually feel during the Christmas holidays. Joy is a popular name for girls born around Christmas time.

Purchase Joy here: Carmilita’s Handmade Jewelry