Strung Chains: Part 4: The Daisy Chain

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Daisy Chain Materials Required: 1 spool white sewing-silk, letter A · No. 12 needles · 1 long bead needle, No. 12 · 1 bunch deep-yellow crystal beads No. 2-0 · 1 bunch white opaque beads No. 4-0 · 1 bunch olive-green crystal beads No. 4-0

Three needles, one longer than the others, are threaded with white silk well waxed. The strands are
tied together at one end and the needles passed through six green crystal beads; the longer needle also goes through one white opaque bead, one larger yellow crystal bead, and another white opaque bead.

Needle No. 3 follows in the same way, but on the left of the centre (see Fig. 1). Needle No. 2 is now brought down through the beads on the left and up through the three centre beads. Needle No. 3 comes down through the three beads on the right and up through the three centre beads, completing the daisy. The three strands are then brought through another six green beads and a second daisy is made.

The chain is continued in this way for its entire length. When completed it gives the effect of tiny daisies strung on a green stem. A charming necklace or collar may be made by stringing the daisies close together and making three or more strands, the lower ones growing gradually longer to give a festoon effect. Continued in Part 5 Golden-brown Silk and Bead Chain

Reference Used: White, Mary. How to Do Beadwork Complete with 100 Illustrations (Kindle Locations 279-281). . Kindle Edition. Copyright 1904 by Doubleday, Page and Company Published May 1904 (in public domain due to expiration of copyright)

republished by: Connie Limon, Bead Jewelry Artisan

Strung Chains: Part 3: The Iridescent Pearl and Gold Chain

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Iridescent Pearl and Gold Chain Materials Required: · 7 large oval baroque pearls · 4 medium oval baroque pearls · 16 large round pearls · 30 small round pearls · 18 large gold beads · 10 large iridescent cut beads · About 52 medium iridescent cut beads · About 118 small iridescent cut beads · 90 flat iridescent cut beads · 4 bunches iridescent seed beads · 1 bunch gold seed beads · 1 spool white purse-silk · A No. 8 needle

A piece of white purse-silk about eight yards long is doubled and the chain is started at the centre. One large oval baroque pearl is first strung, then one flat iridescent bead, one large round pearl, one flat iridescent, one large iridescent, one flat iridescent, one gold seed, one large gold bead, one gold seed, one flat iridescent, one large round pearl, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one medium iridescent, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, and three and an eighth inches of iridescent seed beads in two strands.

One flat iridescent bead is followed by one large gold, one flat iridescent, three gold seeds, one small pearl, three gold seeds, one medium iridescent, three gold seeds, one large round pearl, three gold seeds, one medium iridescent, three gold seeds, one small pearl, one flat iridescent, one large gold, one flat iridescent, and four and a half inches of iridescent seed beads in two strands.

One flat iridescent bead is next strung, then one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large gold, one flat iridescent, one small pearl, one flat iridescent, one medium iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large oval baroque pearl, one flat iridescent, one large iridescent, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one medium pearl, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large oval baroque pearl, one flat iridescent, one medium iridescent, one flat iridescent, one small pearl, one flat iridescent, one large gold, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, and four and a quarter inches iridescent seed beads in two strands.

One flat iridescent bead is followed by one large iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large gold, one flat iridescent, one medium oval pearl, one flat iridescent, one large gold, one flat iridescent, one medium iridescent, one flat iridescent, and three inches of iridescent seed beads in two strings.

Next comes a flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large round pearl, one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one large gold, one small iridescent, one large iridescent, one small iridescent, one large gold, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large round pearl, one flat iridescent, and three and an eighth inches of iridescent seed beads in two strands.

One flat iridescent bead is strung, then one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, one large round pearl, three gold seed beads, one medium iridescent, and three gold seed beads. One large round pearl is followed by one flat iridescent, one small iridescent, one flat iridescent, and two and an eighth inches of iridescent seed beads in two strands. A flat iridescent bead comes next, then a medium iridescent, one large iridescent, one flat iridescent, one small pearl, one flat iridescent, one medium iridescent, one large baroque pearl, and a medium iridescent bead. The other half of the chain is strung in the same order.

Tassels —There are five strands in each tassel, which are strung as follows: Half an inch of iridescent seed beads, one small iridescent, one medium iridescent, one small iridescent, an inch and a half of iridescent seed beads, one small iridescent, one medium iridescent, one small iridescent, one small pearl, one medium iridescent, one small pearl, and one medium iridescent bead.

Three loops of seed beads are made three-quarters of an inch long. The needle is then brought back through the larger beads to where the seed beads began. Here an inch and a half of iridescent seed beads are strung and the needle passes through the larger beads. Half an inch of seed beads completes the strand. The others are strung in the same way.

To be Continued in Part 4: Strung Chains: The Daisy Chain

Reference Used: Copyright 1904 by Doubleday, Page and Company Published May 1904 (in public domain due to expiration of copyright)

White, Mary. How to Do Beadwork Complete with 100 Illustrations (Kindle Location 38). . Kindle Edition.

Re-Written by: Connie Limon, Bead Jewelry Artisan
Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at https://www.etsy.com/shop/carmilitaearrings

Strung Chains: Part 2 The Pale-Yellow Chain

Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at: Carmilita Earrings

Materials Required: · 2 large pale-yellow oval beads · 10 medium pale-yellow oval beads · 40 small pale-yellow oval beads · 1 bunch pale-yellow crystal seed beads No. 0 · 7 yards of dental floss · 2 No. 8 needles Double a piece of dental floss seven yards long and on it string two large pale-yellow beads. These are placed at the middle. String three-eighths of an inch of seed beads in double strands with two needles. For the whole length of the chain the seed beads are thus strung in two strands, while both threads pass through the larger beads. One medium oval bead is followed by three-eighths of an inch of seed beads in two strands. One small oval bead, two inches of seed beads, one small oval, one and three-eighths inches of seed beads, one small oval, one and five- eighths inches of seed beads, one medium oval bead, and two inches of seed beads. One small oval

bead is followed by an inch and three-eighths of seed beads, another small oval bead, two and a quarter inches of seed beads, a small oval bead, two and three-eighths inches of seed beads, one small oval bead, and three-quarters of an inch of seed beads.

Next comes a large oval bead, half an inch of seed beads, one small oval bead, two and an eighth inches of seed beads, one small oval bead, quarter of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, quarter of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, two inches of seed beads, one small oval, and three-quarters of an inch of seed beads.

Next comes a large oval bead, half an inch of seed beads, one small oval bead, two and an eighth inches of seed beads, one small oval bead, quarter of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, quarter of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, two inches of seed beads, one small oval, and three-quarters of an inch of seed beads.

Another large oval bead is followed by three- quarters of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, one and three-quarters- inches of seed beads, one small oval, and one-quarter of an inch of seed beads. One small oval, one-quarter of an inch of seed beads, one small oval, three-quarters of an inch of seed beads, and one medium oval. This is repeated to make the other side of the chain.

Tassels–The tassels are formed of five irregular loops and two ends of seed beads. One medium oval bead is strung at the middle of one of the loops, and another at the tip of one of the ends. The other end has a small oval bead at the tip.

Fan-Chain in Black, Green, and Gold Materials Required: · 12 green cat-eyes · 96 gold-lined crystal beads No. 0 · 3 bunches cut- jet beads No. 0 size · A piece of black purse-silk two yards and a quarter long · A No. 8 needle

The flat round beads known as cat-eyes are particularly beautiful in green. Twelve of these beads combined with gold-lined crystal and cut-jet No. 0 seed beads make a chain that is as effective as it is simple. The beads are strung on a piece of black purse-silk. This should be two yards and a quarter long, to allow for joining, although the finished chain will be

only sixty-eight inches long. Starting at the center, a green cat-eye is first strung, then four gold-lined crystal beads and four and three-quarters inches of cut-jet seed beads. Four more gold-lined crystal beads are followed by one green cat-eye, four gold-lined crystals, and four and three-quarters inches of cut -jet beads. This order is repeated until six cat-eyes (each having four gold-lined crystal beads on either side of it and separated from the next group by four and three-quarters inches of jet beads) have been strung.

Between the sixth cat-eye and the seventh there are five inches of jet beads following four gold-lined crystal beads, and followed by four others. The other side of the chain is strung in the same way, starting at the center and finishing with the four gold-lined crystal beads which are strung just before the seventh cat-eye. Here the ends are tied securely close to the cat-eye with which the side first strung was finished.

To be Continued in Strung Chains: Part 3: The Iridescent Pearl and Gold Chain

Reference Used: Copyright 1904 by Doubleday, Page and Company Published May 1904 (in public domain due to expiration of copyright)

White, Mary. How to Do Beadwork Complete with 100 Illustrations (Kindle Location 38). . Kindle Edition.

Re Written by: Connie Limon, Bead Jewelry Artisan
Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at https://www.etsy.com/shop/carmilitaearrings

Strung Chains Part 1

Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at: Carmilita Earrings

The simplest form of bead work is, of course, the strung chains. How we loved, as children, to make necklaces of beads or berries! To be allowed to string beads was one of the compensations for a rainy day. It still has a fascination for many of us. Women all over the world have felt the charm, and curious and beautiful are some of the chains they have made. Some have used beads of gold, silver, and semi-precious stones; others beads of shell, amber, and coral; while others still make chains of wooden beads or string beans or berries.

Black-eyed Susans — the tiny scarlet beans tipped with black that tourists bring from Florida — may be pierced and strung and make gay chains.

It would seem strange to be able to pick beads for a chain in one’s own garden, yet that is what is done by two girls on Long Island. They have a plant on which grow Job’s-tears. These tear-shaped seeds, ranging in color from pearly white to black (there are brown ones, too), make attractive muff-chains.

The gray ones are strung with cut-steel seed beads, two between each of the Job’s-tears, and the brown in the same way, using gold beads to separate them. But beware, if you raise Job’s-tears, of using them in their natural state. They should be boiled like chestnuts before stringing, for a tiny grub is often found in them, and he may at any time make a meal of the silk on which the beads are strung, or appear on your muff inopportunely.

Of the seed beads No. 0 are most used for these strung chains, with here and there a large Venetian bead in colors which harmonize with the body of the chain. The simplest are strung on a single strand of purse-silk or dental floss about two yards long. Fan-chains may be shorter — about a yard and three-quarters.

Other chains are made with two strands, which are strung for a few inches with seed beads, then twisted like a rope. A large bead is slipped on, to hold the twisted strands, and a few inches more are strung with seed beads. This continues the whole length of the chain.

In finishing, the ends are tied with a firm knot. When chains are simply intended for ornament they are finished with more or less elaborate tassels, and in calculating the length of silk or floss enough should be allowed for them. One such chain is made as follows: Pale-yellow Chain

To be continued in Part 2: Strung Chains: The Pale-Yellow Chain

Reference Used: Copyright 1904 by Doubleday, Page and Company Published May 1904 (in public domain due to expiration of copyright)

White, Mary. How to Do Beadwork Complete with 100 Illustrations (Kindle Location 38). . Kindle Edition.

re-written by: Connie Limon, Bead Jewelry Artisan
Purchase Handmade Bead Jewelry at Carmilita Earrings: https://www.etsy.com/shop/carmilitaearrings